Lost in Munich A story about an investigative journalist trying to break open a scandal in 2008 - when the media is abuzz about the Munich Agreement of 1938.

Petr Zelenka, one of the most familiar and liked modern Czech directors, the maker of Wrong Side Up, keeps his sense of humor and healthy perspective. His Lost in Munich begins as a story about an investigative journalist trying to break open a scandal in 2008 - when the media is abuzz about the Munich Agreement of 1938, in which the French Prime Minister Edouard Daladier betrayed Czechoslovakia to appease Hitler. In a conciliatory gesture, the French ambassador brings the now-dead Daladier's parrot to Prague, forgetting that the bird speaks and is sometimes less than diplomatic. Suddenly, the film takes a 180o turn, jumping from a typical comedy to a subversive mockumentary, a satire with an extremely long blade. Munich skewers the Czechs, their relationship to the past, present, their national stereotypes and image of the French. Zelenka laughs at the film industry, with its jury rigged fixes, screw-ups, blabbering actors, and squeezing of artistic visions into budgets. (He also remembers to poke fun at Polish directors.) Above all, however, he manages to show how history is constantly being rewritten, and does so with intelligent irony, in the spirit of Heydrich, who claimed, The Czechs are laughing beasts.

Krzysztof Kwiatkowski

Duration: 105 mins
Released: 2015
Director: Petr Zelenka
Country of origin: Czech Republic
Classification: unclassified